Reverend Mother


Reverend Mother
Reverend Mother NOUN the title of the Mother Superior of a convent.

English terms dictionary. 2015.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reverend Mother — A Mother Superior of a convent • • • Main Entry: ↑revere * * * noun, pl ⋯ ers [count] : a woman who is the head of a convent : mother superior I will ask the Reverend Mother what to do. often used as a form of address Good morning, R …   Useful english dictionary

  • Reverend Mother — may refer to:* Reverend Mother, in Roman Catholic and Anglican/Episcopal usage, the customary title or salutation for the Abbess or female leader of a religious institution such as a convent or abbey, and for certain other officials of religious… …   Wikipedia

  • Reverend Mother — n a title of respect for the woman in charge of a ↑convent = ↑Mother Superior …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Reverend Mother — noun a title used for a MOTHER SUPERIOR in charge of a CONVENT (=a religious group of women) in the Christian Church …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Reverend Mother — noun the title of the Mother Superior of a convent …   English new terms dictionary

  • Reverend Mother — noun (C) a title of respect for the woman in charge of a convent; mother superior …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Reverend Mother — UK / US noun a title used for a mother superior in charge of a convent (= a religious group of women) in the Christian Church …   English dictionary

  • Reverend Mother — /rɛvrənd ˈmʌðə/ (say revruhnd mudhuh) noun (the title of respect accorded the abbess or presiding nun of a convent.) …   Australian English dictionary

  • Reverend Mother (Dune) — A Reverend Mother is both a Bene Gesserit title and a class or level associated with fictional characters from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. A Reverend Mother is generally a woman of the Bene Gesserit order who has completed her… …   Wikipedia

  • Reverend — The Reverend is a style used as a prefix to the names of many Christian clergy and ministers. It is correctly called a style rather than a title or form of address. The style is also sometimes used by leaders in non Christian religions such as… …   Wikipedia